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New York Steak of Mind

NYC strip steakSometimes, like the song, we are in a “New York State of Mind.” We have never had to “Say Goodbye to Hollywood” or been “Back in the U.S.S.R” but, we do miss the lights of Broadway and nights on Madison Avenue. When we are feeling especially reminiscent, we crave a cheesy slice of pizza. For a more high-end experience, we prefer a juicy Manhattan shaped NYC strip steak. Why, you ask? Because nothing speaks to us of New York City like the sizzling sound of grilled meat. Best of all, our way of cooking strip steak doesn’t even require you to step outdoors. Which is convenient news to any New Yorker.


BT’s INDOOR NY STRIP STEAK RECIPE

Serves 2 hungry people                                        Total Time: 30 Minutes [5 minutes preparation; 10 minutes cooking; 5 minutes rest + defrost and pre-heat time]


WHAT YOU NEED

2 prime New York strip steaks (1-1 1/2 inches thick, about 12 to 14 ounces each; the thickness is more important than the weight)

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

Canola oil

4 teaspoons salt

4 teaspoons black pepper, freshly cracked from peppercorns (trust us!)


WHAT TO DO

1. Great steak begins at the butcher shop so buddy-up to your butcher and ask for two well-marbled New York Strip steaks 1 to 1.5 inches thick. Any thinner and you risk dry meat inside before the outside is perfectly caramelized.

2. Allow the steaks to come to room temperature by removing from the refrigerator approximately 45 minutes prior to cooking. Starting from room temperature allows for shorter oven time and ensures more even cooking.

3. Pre-heat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit (232 degrees Celsius). Once the oven is ready, pre-heat a heavy-bottomed oven-safe pan (preferably cast iron) on the stove over high heat.

4. While the pan is heating, trim excess fat from the side of the steak maintaining a thin layer (necessary for great flavor). Score the fat layer in several places across the steak so that the fat will render. Generously apply salt to both sides of each steak. Coat the steak with enough oil to cover the surface. Crack some fresh peppercorns and set aside for later.

5. Once the pan is very hot, place the steaks on their edges, cooking the thin layer of fat for 1 minute.

6. Next, lay the steaks on their face and continue cooking for approximately 90 seconds or until a crust forms. A proper crust has formed when the steak no longer sticks to the pan. Turn over the steaks and sear the other side of each steak for an additional 90 seconds.

7. Transfer the oven-proof cast iron pan with steaks into the preheated oven. Allow the steak to roast until the center is cooked to your preference. We like to keep them for 3 minutes per side to achieve medium-rare. Check for doneness using a meat thermometer which should register 130-135 degrees Fahrenheit (54-57 degrees Celsius).

8. Remove from the oven and gently brush a small dollop of butter onto the steak for added flavor.* Allow the steak to rest for at least half the total cooking time (approximately 5 minutes if medium) on a wire rack so that it sits above any juices which may drip out. The rest period is extremely important as this allows the steak juices to properly redistribute.

9. Serve seasoned with the fresh cracked pepper, a side of roast vegetables, and a full-bodied glass of red wine. Enjoy!


* BT Tip: For additional sizzle use garlic butter.

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12 replies »

    • Not at all. There are stainless-steel pans with heavy bottoms and some non-stick skillets that can be placed in ovens. You would have to adjust your stove-top heat when searing the steak as non-stick skillets are made of aluminum and along with stainless steel will heat at lower temperatures than iron. The heavier your pan, the better it will work, especially if you can get one that has an aluminum core wrapped in layers of stainless steel.

  1. It’s practically torture reading about a sizzling, mouth-watering hunk of beef while I eat an apple at my desk and plow through the lunch hour. I will practice my visualization techniques and see if I can’t make a Fuji turn into a fillet.
    I’m all about creative fiction.

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